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had gathered in cairo's tahrir square calling for the ouster of president mohamed morsy. opposition leaders say new powers grabbed by morsy make him look like a dictator. reza sayah has more on the massive protests. >> reporter: outrage, clashes and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsy. >> we're here because we don't want morsy to rule us anymore. >> a one-man show. he wants to do everything. nothing at all of what we want, you know? >> reporter: on thursday, the new president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says will designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees bans anyone from overturning any of his declarations since he took over office in june. that order is
is a live look at tahrir square. group of hard-core demonstrators vowing to stay until until mohammed morsi invokes a decree granting himself absolute power. this is how bad the violence got. thousands clashing with police and morsi supporters and new pressure on the president to back down and fear that violence will flare up. steve? >> reporter: the number of those tents put up by protestors has grown. they are intent to stay there throughout the week but the number of protestors on the street has declined dramatically over the last 24 hours. on late friday there were up to 40,000 people on the square. the protests did turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be
with the lathes decree from hamid morsi. morsi giving himself almost ax slut power dosuspending judicia review of any decision he makes bringing instability to the fragile middle east. welcome to america's news headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian st
supporters and opponents of mohamed morsi are calling for mass demonstrations. nbc's jim maceda is high above cairo's tahrir square. jim, good evening. >> reporter: hi, kate. well, of course, tahrir square behind me was ground zero for egypt's 2011 uprising, but lately it's had a similar feel and the smell of tear gas is back in the air. clashes between morsi opponents and riot police raged through the night and into a second day. protesters turning tahrir square into a tent encampment and pledging to target the besieged president until he designs or rescinds the decrees which give him sweeping powers and put him above the law. the move has triggered riots across the country, injuring more than 300 egyptians. "if morsi does that, we'll be exactly like iran, said this protester. "he is making himself not just a dicer, he's making himself a god." he said he had to take action to take radical action to save egypt from hosni mubarak's regime. but egyptians like alid mahmoud, a field medic who lost his friend in the uprising feels cheated by morsi and the islamist. they got his vote, but he says t
ago mohamed morsi won widespread praise for brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today thousands of egyptians protested at morsi granted himself broad new powers, putting his decisions above any court. morsi called the move temporary but at least 100 people were injured as protesters clashed with police in cities across egypt, including alexandria and the capital. holly williams begins our coverage tonight in cairo. >> reporter: thousands of egyptians poured on to the streets, furious with the country's first democratically elected president. they accused mohamed morsi of behaving like a pharaoh, making a power grab by presidential decree. during the arab spring, egyptians came together on tahrir square to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stor
grab by egypt's president. mohammed morsi is insisting he acted within the rights when he granted himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the word
weekend. is egypt headed for a muslim brother take over. that is the fears of morsi crashing in streets of cairo. today's protest are not that high emotions remain raw in prepation of morsi. top judges are calling itun precedent they are calling morsi the modern day favor and fearing that he would be a dictator. i am uma live in washington. america's news head quarters starts right now. in response to the opposition in the streets was cairo. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a protest in cairo. they are joining with the latest on the developing story. steve. uma right now we are looking at what could be a show down between morsi and the country's judges here in cairo and others in the country. they say they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at
with deep divisions between member states. >> violent protests across egypt a day after president morsi assumes new sweeping powers. >> what is at stake in the battle for control of congress? we have a full report. the eu summit has ended without any agreement on the union's next seven-year budget, but top officials in brussels say they are confident a deal will be reached early next year. >> hours of talks failed to bridge big gaps between richer countries and those that rely most on eu funding. be contributors like britain, the netherlands, and sweden want spending bold back across the board -- rolled back across the board. >> european leaders were skeptical going into negotiations, so it was no surprise when ministers called off talks without a working budget. >> everyone brought their own goals to the table, and you know germany's position, but we are still focused on working toward a budget everyone can agree to. >> that means winning over england. prime minister david cameron has promised to veto any deal that fails to cut spending, and he has found a supporter in the dutch leader
for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it continues to grow, this could put much more pressure on the egyptian president and we're looking at tahrir squ
until president morsi withdraws the sweeping decree he issued last week. it gives him broad new powers, free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): we demand the president listens to the people who chose him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted through dialogues, that these issues be selgtzed democrat
as president morsi rewrites the rules. >>> push my children and i will stab you. >> the holiday shopping season has object just begun. and what is mother earth's real age? marco rubio says he doesn't know. bill nye the science guy. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> it is sunday, november 25th. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. we begin with the protests in egypt. over night protesters clashed with security forces. this was the scene in dammanhour north of cry row. reza sayah joining us. when can we expect the big one to start? >> reporter: the big one starts tuesday. they're calling for a 1 million main protest on tuesday. that's going to repeat calling for opponents of mr. morsi. but even today there are pro-morsi demonstrated takes place. they're going to be take place in cities outside of cairo. in some of these cities you have anti-morsi protesters as well. we've seen clashes in the early morning hours. they're going to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood, supporters of the muslim brotherhood. things getting ugly there. the focal point of these anti-government protest
in tamrir square that overthrough egyptian leader mubarak, but this time to his successor, mohammed morsi. >> this is a new era in egypt. and this is not what it was about. and it's about the president from all of these unquestioned rights. and now, it's just, we're way stepped back than where we were before. >> the protests, which include a ransacking of the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, after sweeping new powers that he could issue any decree and any issue would be filed and not to be appealed or overturned by the courts. >> the revolution has passed, but will not stop. the judiciary is a respected institution along with loyal members, those who wish to hide within the institution i'll be watching them. >> morsi says the moves are temporary. in a few month's time and they call a necessary move to defeat holdovers. and the moves have infuriated the opposition, one time egyptian presidential candidate mohammed el baradei says that he's setting himself up. and today, morsi vowed he would not back down. >> i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone. to go against a
president morsi granted himself unchecked powers and sent thousands of protesters back into the streets, people who had been helping to topple mubarak, now against the man they call the new egypt egyptian pharaoh. what are the chances we're headed for a new islamist coo in egypt? >> it could be headed that way. you could also be headed back to a military takeover. if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there's continued chaos. i'll never forget after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square. a young woman said it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that's what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president
in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
mohamud morsi is overseeing the talks and he has become the central figure in the delicate negotiations. morsi was at his sister's funeral today but he did issue a statement saying israeli aggression would end today. tuesday. at the end of the day the two sides still had not reached agreement. a hamas official told reuters they had come close but the talks "must wait until tomorrow." now this is morsi's real debut on the world stage. he rose from his position as head of the engineering department at a cairo university to become president of egypt last year. it's really an intriguing story. morsi replaced, as you know, president hosni mubarak who had been in power for three decades and was one of israel's few allies in the region and morsi ran as the muslim brotherhood's candidate and he promised to implement islamic law. but analysts say that he's not really a true religious fundamentalist. that he had to adopt those positions to fend off competition from islamist extremists. and his background does seem t
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
, christians, youth groups and women's rights groups. some have sued to dissolve the panel. morsy's decree for bids that. as nightfall approached, anger turned to violence similar to the egyptian revolution protesters clashing with police. we're along one of the major arteries leading into tahrir square. clashes between security forces and protesters, tear gas. and we're moving away. as the protests intensified, mr. morsy appealed for calm. in a speech hundreds of his supporters who gathered outside the presidential palace in cairo, he defended his decrees and rejected accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear path, a path that achieves a clear goal. >> reporter: throughout the early morning hours, there were pockets of clashes and the injuries continue to pile-up and many demonstrators pitched tents in the square, an indication that these demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >> rez rez sesayia in cairo. >> sad news from the world of entertainment. larry hagman has died.
president morsi for democracy. that's ahead. was not prepared. i just asked myself, "am i doing all that i can, am i doing the best that i can for her?" my whole family was so thrilled and so excited. it was just the start of a wonderful journey. i feel lucky every single day that i have my parents, i have my grandparents and that alea has grandparents and great-grandparents. sometimes they'll joke around and they'll say, " how's our baby, how's our baby?" and she's almost like this collective family baby. the fact that all of these generations can live together happily and get to know each other and learn from each other is really incredible. my mom was diagnosed with type-1 diabetes when she was 15. when she was first diagnosed they didn't even have any blood sugar monitor. people really didn't know what the future would hold for her but now, today, there are so many resources available to her. she has all these technological devices to help her stay healthy. >> it's sunny out. >> it is sunny out. since alea was born, i almost feel more responsible for making the world a better place. we
didn't warn you. violence erupts in egypt after president morsi grants himself unmitigated power? what does this mean for america and its allies? and we'll ask did president obama hand morsi a victory? [ male announcer ] red lobster's hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith roastedegetab! i'm actually looking at the wo grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. at pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and in
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
morsi's sweeping expansion of his powers on thursday when he said courts can no longer review his decisions. here is the latest. one person was killed and 60 hurt in a clash at a muslim brotherhood office. president morsi meets the top judges who oppose his move tomorrow. both sides plan major demonstrations on tuesday. we begin with holly williams in cairo. >> reporter: there were running street battles in central cairo today as protestors angry with president morsi clashed with the police. they fought with rocks and tear gas canisters in chaotic themes but without either side gaining very much ground. on tahrir square the home of last year's egyptian revolution peaceful protestors are staging a sit-in. they've set up camp and say they will stay until the president rescinds the decree that gave him sweeping new powers. their banner demands an egypt for all egyptians. but less than a year after its transition to democracy this country looks increasingly divided. president morsi reiterated today that his new powers are only temporary. he said he'll relinquish them next year when eg
this cease-fire possible. called egyptian president mahmoud morsi, and benjamin netanyahu. president obama reiterated the united states believes israel has the right to defend itself. also said the united states would take this moment to work towards helping israel to further secure the region. but also talked about the importance of trying to achieve a broader security agreement in the region. and in speaking to egyptian president mahmoud morsi, president obama really thanked him for playing such a pivotal role. the white house saying that is one of the big things that came out of the past several days, alex. that president obama and egyptian president mahmoud morsi spent a lot of time talking on the phone. by some accounts they had six conversations in several details. and through those conversations, president obama and president morsi really strengthened their relationship. there was a question surrounding president morsi in part because of his ties to the muslim brotherhood, and feld morsi was pragmatic and they were on the same page in wanting to broker a cease-fire. that could have
against morsi raided an office, and in cairo security forces fired tear gas at thousands of protesters. 100 people reportedly were injured. critics say president morsi is making himself a dictator. he claims he granded himself the new powers so figures from the former regime cannot block progress. steve, what is the scene like right now? >> you can hear a lot of it now, and as the day has gone on and tonight the protests have become more violent. a fire is burning before protesters set a flame to a monument, and there are battles between security forces and younger protesters throwing glass bottles filled with gasoline and police are firing ban tear gas. the test is tomorrow after 40,000 protests come out. it will be a long-term fight of the people against the president , anger and bitterness against the egyptian president saying any decree he issues is legal and there is no appeal to the decree putting himself above the law and the courts and tens of thousands in cairo not happy about that move by the democratically elected president. >>gregg: does this move from president morsi catch
that gave birth to the country's revolution less than two years ago, this sends president mohamed morsi a message, what freedom fighters say must happen to stop a new cycle of violence in the streets. fox reports live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who played the villain, the world couldn't help loving. i'm harris faulkener well, begin with egypt on edge and turmoil and violence spreading and response to a colossal power grab. by egypt's islamist president, mohamed morsi. though country's rocky transition to democracy may hit a brick wall, two days of viol
who abused the >> last wednesday egyptian president mohammed morsi was praised for his statesman-like and pragmatic role in brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas. but on the domestic front it was viewed by many as a power grab as morsi faced accusations that he was trying to turn himself into the new mubarak. president morsi assumed total legislative power. in a fumble decree last week morsi unilaterally declared that the decisions he made would not be subject to appeal in any court or oversight by any authority, granting him nearly dictataldictate really power today after meeting with the judge the supreme judicial court morsi agreed to narrow the scope of his decree. joining me now is aaron david miller former middle eastern adviser for democratic and republican administrations. thank you for joining us. >> a pleasure. >> eliot: so was this a power grab or was it smart to keep the courts from derailing the egyptian move to democracy. >> i think it was both. morsi clearly faced challenges. many of these judges are mubarak holdovers, determined to create common balance.
is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of protests? >> reporter: well, we're going to find out in the coming weeks, but the political landscape is cer
mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator f
protests because of their new leader and what he's done. president mohamed morsi, seen here with secretary of state hillary clinton, helping to broker that truce, but right after, a push from morsi for more power. many of the people of egypt said not so fast, and the protests are growing now. abc's matt gutman in the region again tonight for us. >> reporter: with massive protests, a cloud of tier gas, egypt is again in turmoil tonight. the violence, a reaction to egypt's first democratically elected leader, mohamed morsi, declaring all his presidential decisions are exempt from appeal or review by law makers or the courts. protesters torching a muslim brother office in alexandria and mohamed elle bar are detweeting, he appointed himself egypt's new f farrow. >> just months ago, morsi was obscure before being elected in may, shooting to international prominence this week by brokers the hamas/israel cease-fire. solidifying himself as a key u.s. al li. >> i want to thank president morsi for his personal leadership to deescalate the situation in gaza and end the violence. >> it put the united
's about muhammad morsi. critics call morsi egypt's new dictator. this is something the white house is watching closely. >> the obama administration finds itself in an uncomfortable position. it's praised as a peace keeper, a man who's drawn violent protests at home. >>> reporter: the crowd accuses muhammad morsi, the first freely elected president, of making himself a pharoah. tens of thousands of activists poured in to the square, the same place where it toppled his predecessor. this time they want morsi to go. more than half the voters elected him president five months ago. he says the president is setting himself up as a god. morsi decreed that any decisions or laws he makes cannot be appealed, stopped, or overturned until a new constitution is approved next spring. he said his ruling will route out evils who are blocking democratic reform. morsi said it doesn't worry me that i have opponents. i have reserved all rights for my brothers in the opposition so they can even hold a revolution if they must. protesters did ransack and torch the muslim brotherhood officer that supports
, cbs news, new york. >> turning overseas, the struggle over egyptian president mohammed morsi expanded powers ratcheted up another notch today, a panel of top judges denounced the move as an unprecedented assault on the judiciary, joining a wave of protests that includes top opposition leaders as well as demonstrators on the street. >> holly williams joins us now from cairo with the latest. >> chip, here in central cairo we are seeing protesters angry with morsi and throwing stones at the police and are firing back with tear gas canisters, and earlier today one prominent opposition figure, mohammed al faridi accused the president of giving himself the powers of a pharoe a ah. >> the protests were smaller than yesterday. >> those who believe president morsi made a brazen power grab clashed with the authorities. >> but many here who support president morsi's expanded role. >> a spokesperson for his freedom and justice party, she says the new measure that is temporary and not anti-democratic, because mr. morsi wants 52 percent of the vote in the, won 52 percent of the presidential electio
and morsi. two pragmatists trying to find a way to mediate this immediate conflict. you see it against the backdrop of an islamist backdrop of turkey and the riots in jordan that will cause increasing problems. you have that changing environment which you know more about. the arabs need something different. the governments need to be more responsive to their people. it's an opening for a different relationship. no american president is going to criticize, i would argue, israel's launching of this war. it is an opening for our relationship with egypt, turkey, to implement a cease-fire to monitor gaza and israel's relationship, but overarching all of it, it's a painful issue to discuss. anything we say on this show is going to be criticized. >> you think? >> i think. it's a history. going back to at least '67, the united states role as the enabler, as the political diplomatic economic enabler that in many ways, in a younger generation is seeing israelis that is not in the long term benefit of the security of the country. i make one last point. i urge your viewers to try to watch an israe
morsi. egyptians started rallying last week after president morsi expanded his powers. young people in opposition parties that ousted the mubarak government last year have been occupying tahrir square in central cairo. some of them helped elect morsi. security forces stormed the square wednesday and fired tear gas. protesters threw stones. one of them told nhk they will demonstrate until morsi reverses his decision or resigns. the president announced constitutional amendments last week making it impossible for judicial courts to overturn his decisions. the protests against him have spread to other cities in egypt. demonstrators reportedly clashed with supporters of morsi's party, the muslim brotherhood. many people are believed to have been injured. these are the latest public demonstrations morsi has faced since he took office in june. >>> two car bombs have exploded in damascus in the eastern district. syrian's state media described the blasts as -- the second bomb went off when people gathered for the first blast. the activists blamed government forces for the bombings, claiming
to netanyahu, talk to president morsi of egypt. and he recognizes something that almost every president eventually discovers which is that america is still indispensable player when it comes to these sort of conflicts in the middle east. pete: still the indispensable player and hasn't changed with the arab spring? >> the arab spring hasn't changed that and you've seen the revolution of the arab spring and our relationship to it particularly in this relationship, this new partnership between president obama and president morsi of egypt. very interesting history. president morsi from the muslim brotherhood just a few weeks back before the election, the americans and the obama administration very upset at morsi for not doing more to protect the embassy in cairo during some of those protests there. this week, you saw this sort of new partnership developing and they were on the phone repeatedly. 11:30 at night. 2:30 in the morning from air force one. morsi was a key as far as he could see to solving this problem. he was investing a lot of his own capital with president obama was in this new
shopping over the weekend and spent more than $59 billion. morsi 28 football fields. last cyber monday-- its busiest day of the year-- amazon processed 200 orders per second. amazon vice president craig berman says the company expects business this year will be even better. >> we've hired and are continuing to hire 50,000 seasonal workers to meet customer demand. >> reporter: that's in addition to amazon's 20,000 full time workers like packing manager mark pulley. >> we need to come up with a new word for busy. we've been on hyperdrive. >> reporter: across the country, online sales account for 10% of holiday purchases, says ellen davis with the national retail federation. >> the share of sales happening online is still fairly low. however, the internet influences now about 50% of what consumers buy. >> reporter: because shoppers look for sales and compare prices online before they buy. and that stretches over the whole holiday season. online sales jump more than 20% on black friday. and thanksgiving was a shopping day this year. >> yeah, it started early. >> reporter: jill poleri, a re
overshadowed all of that. he was up late. he was up with morsi and netanyahu. morsi is the conduit into hamas. the united states doesn't have any direct conversations with hamas. the conduit is morsi. gets off the phone with netanyahu. decides to call morsi back. after that, the president and the secretary huddle. time for shuttle diplomacy. so the decision to send her there and it comes with some risk. the united states putting that much skin in the game getting that involved if suddenly nothing is prevented and in 72 hours a ground invasion begins, a little diplomatic egg on the face of the united states and secretary clinton. there's potential reward down the road. this could be a big feather in her cap at the end of her career. but toss that aside right now, the big concern is what do you do to prevent what could be a ground invasion and what was interesting at this briefing, chris, i want to play another bite here from ben rhodes. he was asked specifically has the united states asked the israelis to hold off on a ground invasion? and here is ben rhodes' answer evasion, if you will. >> we
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
-time regional party, turkey. turkish prime minister morsi represents an islamist political party has condemned them saying israel is committing terrorist attacks. for more, i'm joined by p.j. crowley, former assistant secretary of state for public affairs for president obama. former special assistant for national security affairs to president president clinton and a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us, professor. >> pleasure, eliot always. >> eliot: it seems so tantalizingly closer. a cease-fire was about to be announced. you've been through the process before. can you infer or suggest or understand what would be a sticking point at this late moment? >> part of this is probably one or both of the parties haven't got man they need out of current crisis. i strongly suspect it is probably on the hamas side where they're looking for assurances that if there is a cease-fire, there will be some relaxation of the israeli blockade and obviously israel is in no position to grant such a wish as
president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm swan song enabling the outgoing secretary of state to bask over her work in countrys like burma. instead, both spent much of their time in asia intensively dialing up mideast leaders. the president speaking with morsi three times in 24 hours. including aboard air force one on the way home to america. the president tan secretary both been on the phone, nonstop with regional leaders for a number of days. the purpose of her trip is to continue and intensify that engagement now face to face. >> the stakes for the president are enormous on the eaves of a second term. with analysts warping it may be the beginning of a much wider conflict between israel and iran. >> there is rise of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is
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